Acta Medica Iranica 2008. 46(6):461-466.

ASSESSMENT OF ENDOMETRIAL-SUBENDOMETRIAL BLOOD FLOW DETECTED BY COLOR DOPPLER SONOGRAPHY AND UTERINE RECEPTIVITY IN INFERTILE WOMEN
M Aghahoseini, K Tuba, V Marsousi , A Aleyasin

Abstract


ndometrial vasculature has been shown to play an important role in the early endometrial response to the implanting blastocyst, and vascular changes may contribute to uterine receptivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of endometrial and subendometrial vascularity and thickness in uterine receptivity in infertile women treated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). A total of 175 women were recruited from our ART program from June 2005 to May 2006. In the first stage, down regulation was done using GnRH-a and then ovarian hyperstimulation was initiated with human menopausal gonadotrophin and in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures were performed. Then, the endometrial-subendometrial blood flow distribution pattern was determined by color Doppler ultrasonography and its characteristics were compared between pregnant (n = 56) and non-pregnant (n = 119) women.  Zones 1, 2 and 3 of vascular penetration were found in 15.4%, 22.3%, and 62.3% of patients, respectively. The number of implanted embryos was 62 and implantation rate was 11.61%. There was no significant association between implantation rate and endometrial thickness or zone of vascular penetration. Among all women, fertility occurred in 56 (32.2%) women. Zone 1 of vascular penetration was found in 10.71% and 10.08% (P = 0.898), zone 2 in 16.07% and 13.44% (P = 0.643), and zone 3 in 41.07% and 41.17% (P = 0.989) of pregnant and non-pregnant groups, respectively. Endometrial-subendometrial blood flow (according the findings of Doppler ultrasonography) in women undergoing ART could not predict endometrial receptivity and IVF outcome.


Keywords


Uterine blood flow, color Doppler sonography, uterine receptivity,

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