A National Survey: Desire of Dermatology Residents to Train in Cosmetic Dermatology and Its Association With Learning Medical Dermatology

  • Bita Kiafar Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Yalda Nahidi Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Negar Morovatdar Clinical Research Center Unit, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Masoud Maleki Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Mehrdad Teimoorian Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Kiarash Ghazvini Antimicrobial Resistance Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
  • Sadegh Vahabi Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.
Keywords: Cosmetic dermatology, Medical dermatology, Curriculum, Survey

Abstract

The main challenge for training in cosmetic dermatology is the difference in the attitudes of residency programs and residents about the necessity and amount of education during the residency period. A national online survey conducted between September 6th and November 21st, 2017. Residents, members of the Iranian Board of Dermatology, faculty members and program directors (PDs) were asked to participate in the survey.174 participants from 12 residency programs participated in this study and the response rate of residents, professors, and Dermatology Board Directory Members (Boardmans) and PDs was 89.8%, 61.7%, and 81.8%, respectively. Residents declared greater tendency towards practicing medical dermatology (mean score, 5.165±0.8335) over the five years after graduation than that of was perceived by professors (4.043±1.2988), and Boardmans and PDs (4.059±1.0290) (P˂0.001). The first residents’ priority was practicing in medical dermatology (5.165±0.8335) during 5-years after graduation. However, professors (5.261±0.8282) and Boardmans and PDs (5.176±0.7276) predicted residents' first priority would be practicing cosmetic dermatology (P˂0.001). Forty one (60.3%) of the professors, Boardmans, and PDs agreed or strongly agreed that residents’ desire to learn more about cosmetic procedures resulted in their decreased interest in learning medical procedures (P=0.18). Medical dermatology is still clearly the basis for training in residency programs,and even for residents who have a high tendency to practice cosmetic dermatology, there is a strong tendency to work in the field of medical dermatology as well.

References

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Published
2018-12-25
How to Cite
1.
Kiafar B, Nahidi Y, Morovatdar N, Maleki M, Teimoorian M, Ghazvini K, Vahabi S. A National Survey: Desire of Dermatology Residents to Train in Cosmetic Dermatology and Its Association With Learning Medical Dermatology. Acta Med Iran. 56(9):591-597.
Section
Articles