Study guides: effective tools to improve self-directed learning skills of medical students.

  • Mahboobeh Khabaz Mafinejad Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Rokhsareh Aghili Endocrine Research Center (Firouzgar), Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran.
  • Zahra Emami Endocrine Research Center (Firouzgar), Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran.
  • Mojtaba Malek Endocrine Research Center (Firouzgar), Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran.
  • Hamidreza Baradaran Center for Educational Research in Medical Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mansoureh Taghavinia Department of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mohammad E Khamseh Endocrine Research Center (Firouzgar), Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Tehran, Iran.
Keywords: Study guide, Self-directed learning, Medical student, Lifelong learning

Abstract

In medicine, there is a rapid development of a knowledge base. Medical professionals need to sustain and advance their competence to practice in response to these varieties. So, there is increased interest in self-directed learning methods. Study guides can make a major contribution to self-directed learning. This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of study guides on improving self-learning skills of medical students in the Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS). In this quasi-experimental study, 46 medical students were randomly assigned into two groups; the intervention group and the control group. Both groups participated in a diagnostic test at the beginning of the course (pre-test). The same test was taken at the end of the course (post-test). The intervention group was provided with study guides on thyroid disorders and diabetes. Meanwhile, they continued their routine clinical training. The control group was only involved in the conventional training program. Students in the intervention group were also asked to complete a designed questionnaire in regard to their attitude toward the study guides. At enrollment, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean scores of the pre-test for the control group and the intervention group were 6.18 and 6.13 respectively (P=0.9). In the post-test, the mean score of the students in the intervention group was considerably higher: 9.25 vs. 12 (P=0.002). The students in the intervention group found the study guides useful. The study guides were potentially effective in motivating self-learning in this group of medical students and had a remarkable effect on their final score.

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How to Cite
1.
Khabaz Mafinejad M, Aghili R, Emami Z, Malek M, Baradaran H, Taghavinia M, Khamseh ME. Study guides: effective tools to improve self-directed learning skills of medical students. Acta Med Iran. 52(10):781-785.
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