Comparison of Two Regimens of RhG-CSF in Neutropenic Neonatal Septicemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial

  • Fatemeh Nayeri Maternal-Fetal-Neonatal Health Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Habib Soheili Department of Pediatrics, Pediatrics Center of Excellence, Children's Medical Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mahbod Kaveh Department of Neonatal, Mirza Koochak Khan Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Zohre Oloomi Yazdi Department of Pediatrics, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mamak Shariat Mail Maternal-Fetal-Neonatal Health Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Hosein Dalili Maternal-Fetal-Neonatal Health Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords:
Neonatal, Sepsis, Neutropenia, RhG-CSF

Abstract

Considering the 50% mortality rate of neonatal septicemia associated with neutropenia and increasing resistance to antibiotics, simultaneous antibiotic therapy strategies are becoming more important. However, few studies have been performed to evaluate effectiveness of RhG-CSF in the treatment of neutropenia in neonates. This randomized clinical trial was performed on 40 neutropenic neonates with septicemia who were hospitalized in Vali-e-Asr and Mirza Koochak Khan Hospitals (Tehran, Iran). The neonates were randomly divided into two equal groups RhG-CSF was administered as a subcutaneous single dose of 10μg/kg/s.c. to neonates in group A and as 10μg/kg/s.c./day once daily for 3 days to neonates in group B. CBC and differential count was checked 6, 24 and 48 hours after the last dose. There was no significant difference in mean birth weight, gender, age, and risk factors between two groups. Neutropenia was improved 48 hours after the last dose, whilst there was no significant statistical difference between two groups (P>0.05). The final outcome including death, duration of hospitalization and duration of antibiotics therapy after RhG-CSF administration did not differ between two groups (P>0.05). The results of this study showed that administration of a single dose of RhG-CSF (10μg/kg) was effective in treating neonatal septicemic neutropenia.

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How to Cite
1.
Nayeri F, Soheili H, Kaveh M, Oloomi Yazdi Z, Shariat M, Dalili H. Comparison of Two Regimens of RhG-CSF in Neutropenic Neonatal Septicemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Acta Med Iran. 49(9):575-578.
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