The Prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorder in Two Different Populations in Northern Province of Iran: A Comparison Using Different Indicators Recommended by WHO

  • Setilla Dalili Mail Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Zahra Mohtasham-Amiri Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Seyed Mahmood Rezvani Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Arsalan Dadashi Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Abdolreza Medghalchi Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Simin Hoseini Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Hajar Gholami-Nezhad Vice- Chancellor of Health, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.
  • Anis Amirhaki Department of Pediatric, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.
Keywords:
Iodine deficiency disorder (IDD), Neonatal TSH, Urine iodine, WHO criteria

Abstract

Comparison of the prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorder (IDD) in neonates and school children using two different WHO indicators. From 2006 to 2010, 119701 newborns were screened by measurement of serum TSH level by heel prick. Neonates who had blood TSH ≥ 5 mIU/l were recalled for more evaluation. In the same period of time, urine iodine was measured in 1200 school-aged children. The severity of IDD was classified using WHO, UNICEF, ICCIDD criteria. Between 2006 and 2010 a total of 138832 neonates were screened in Guilan province and the total recall rate (neonates with TSH level ≥ 5 mIU/l) was 1.8 %. The incidence rate of Congenital Hypothyroidism (CH) was 1/625. The median urine iodine level in school-aged children was 200-299 μg/l. Considering the WHO, UNICEF, ICCIDD criteria, Guilan province would be classified as a none-IDD endemic area. However, health care systems should pay attention to the iodine excess and the risk of iodine induced hyperthyroidism in this population.

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How to Cite
1.
Dalili S, Mohtasham-Amiri Z, Rezvani SM, Dadashi A, Medghalchi A, Hoseini S, Gholami-Nezhad H, Amirhaki A. The Prevalence of Iodine Deficiency Disorder in Two Different Populations in Northern Province of Iran: A Comparison Using Different Indicators Recommended by WHO. Acta Med Iran. 50(12):822-826.
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