The Intricate Expression of CC Chemokines in Glial Tumors: Evidence for Involvement of CCL2 and CCL5 but Not CCL11

  • Mozhgan Moogooei Department of Immunology, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran.
  • Masoud Shamaei Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Hossein Khorramdelazad Molecular Medicine Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran.
  • Shirin Fattahpour Department of Biochemistry, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran.
  • Seyed Mohammad Seyedmehdi Pediatric Respiratory Diseases Research Center, National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Maryam Moogooei Department of Immunology, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Yazd, Iran
  • Gholamhossein Hassanshahi Mail Molecular Medicine Research Center, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, Iran.
  • Behjat Kalantari Khandani Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.
Keywords:
Glioblastoma, Anaplastic astrocytoma, Chemokine

Abstract

Chemokines are biologically active peptides involved in the pathogenesis of various pathologies including brain malignancies. They are amongst primitive regulators of the development of immune responses against malignant glial tumors. The present study aimed to examine the expression of CC chemokines in anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiform patients at both mRNA and protein levels. Blood specimens in parallel with stereotactic biopsy specimens were obtained from 123 patients suffering from glial tumors and 100 healthy participants as a control. The serum levels of CCL2, CCL5, and CCL11 were measured by ELISA and stereotactic samples subjected to western and northern blotting methods for protein and mRNA, respectively. Demographic characteristics were also collected by a researcher-designed questionnaire. Results of the present study indicated that, however,CCL2 andCCL5 are elevated in serum and tumor tissues of patients suffering from a glial tumor at both mRNA and protein levels, theCCL11 was almost undetectable. According to the findings of the present investigation, it could presumably be reasonable to conclude that chemokines are good predictive molecules for expecting disease severity, metastasis, and response to treatment.

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Published
2015-12-22
How to Cite
1.
Moogooei M, Shamaei M, Khorramdelazad H, Fattahpour S, Seyedmehdi SM, Moogooei M, Hassanshahi G, Kalantari Khandani B. The Intricate Expression of CC Chemokines in Glial Tumors: Evidence for Involvement of CCL2 and CCL5 but Not CCL11. Acta Med Iran. 53(12):770-777.
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