The 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields Can Lead to a Reduction in the Number of CD4+T Cells, IL-2, IL-10, and IL-17a on PBMC Cultures

  • Maimun Z Arthamin ORCID Mail Medical Science Doctoral Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia. AND Department of Clinical Pathology, Medical Faculty of Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia.
  • Anis Sulalah ORCID Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia
  • Resvina Resvina ORCID Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia
  • Chomsin Widodo ORCID Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia
  • Agustina T Endharti ORCID Medical Science Doctoral Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia
  • Edi Widjajanto ORCID Medical Science Doctoral Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia. AND Department of Clinical Pathology, Medical Faculty of Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia.
  • Tedy Juliandhy ORCID Department of Electrical Engineering, Hang Tuah University, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia
Keywords:
1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF), Cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) T cells, Interleukin-2 (IL-2), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), Interleukin-17a (IL-17a)

Abstract

Although there have been many studies on the effects of electromagnetic fields on humans, scientists still have no agreement on the effects found because several studies showed no statistically significant effects. The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields exposure on the immune system are varied, ranging from no effects to genotoxic effects on lymphocytes. Our study aimed to investigate whether exposure to 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in variable durations and distances could lead to the dysregulation of T helper 1, 2, and 17. The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultures from healthy human subjects were exposed to 1800 MHz RF-EMF, with durations of 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes and distances of 5 and 25 cm. We evaluated the effects of RF-EMF exposure on the number of CD4+ T cells, IL-2, IL-10, and IL-17a after 48 hours of culture with the flow cytometer. The closer the distance, the lower the number of CD4+ T cells. The longer the exposure, the lower the number of CD4+ T cells and the number of IL-2, IL-10, and IL-17a decreases significantly. CD4+ T cells expressing IL-2 increased significantly with the increase of the duration of 1800 MHz RF-EMF exposure (15, 30, and 45 min), but decreased at 60 minutes of exposure when compared to PBMCs without exposure. Sixty minutes of PBMC exposure to RF-EMF with a distance of 5 cm causes a significant reduction in the number of CD4+ T cells, the expression of IL-2, IL-10, and IL-17a.

Author Biographies

Anis Sulalah, Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Resvina Resvina, Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Postgraduate Program, Department of Physics, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Agustina T Endharti, Medical Science Doctoral Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Doctoral Program of Medical Science, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Brawijaya, East Java, Indonesia

Tedy Juliandhy, Department of Electrical Engineering, Hang Tuah University, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia

Department of Electrical Engineering, Hang Tuah University, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia

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Published
2020-11-19
How to Cite
1.
Arthamin M, Sulalah A, Resvina R, Widodo C, Endharti A, Widjajanto E, Juliandhy T. The 1800 MHz Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields Can Lead to a Reduction in the Number of CD4+T Cells, IL-2, IL-10, and IL-17a on PBMC Cultures. Acta Med Iran. 58(9):430-438.
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Articles